Adventures In Running

IT'S NOT HOW FAST YOU ARE, IT'S HOW FAST YOU LOOK!

I Think I’m Gunna’ Hurl!

Written By: The Hornet - Feb• 16•12

Is he really going to do a whole post on stomach evacuation?  It’s true, I am. So I request your full attention as the flight attendants demonstrate the safety features of this blog.  A bag is located in the back of the seat in front of you in the event of illness, so get ready to read on.

It happens to most runners at some point and you have most certainly seen it at a race.  The runners retch occurs for many reasons and I contend that it is not always such a bad thing.  One of the most common reasons for losing your lunch is due to drinking far too many liquids before a short race.  All too often there is someone in the beginning of mile three leaning against a tree, relieving themselves of a gallon of Gatorade.  The obvious answer is to have an 8 oz. glass of liquid twenty minutes before the start of a 5k.  It’s better to stop quickly in a race if you have  to get a “splash and go” rather than losing large amounts of time puking.  So let’s try and avoid this one in the future, shall we?

I mentioned in my post entitled “Half Way There!” that some runners make the mistake of combining thick sports drinks with sports chews or gels.  Unfortunately the fuels you consume don’t break down well unless they are combined with water.   But when consumed with a sports drink, many times it will create a mixture that sits in the stomach only causing nausea and not being turned into the needed energy to complete the race.

Overheating and heatstroke are also causes of the mid-race hurl and this can be very dangerous.  If you believe you are suffering from heat stroke, stop immediately and take any steps necessary to cool your body temperature.  I recommend getting assistance from race officials.

Now for the good part of throwing up.  If you finish a 5k race and cross the finish line only to start dry heaving, good job!  Many runners don’t push themselves toward the end of a race to the point of being nauseous. It’s a combination of over exertion and sometimes lack of oxygen while maintaining a breakneck pace in the last two tenths of a mile. So unless it’s the end of a short race, let’s try to avoid the technicolor yarn from now on, huh?  And remember, always run for fun and race to place!

 

 

 

© Copyright 2012 The Hornet, All rights Reserved. Written For: Adventures In Running
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